CONTENTS


The initiation and relation with
the Lama


The basic practices of Mahayana


The life of Buddha


Introduction to

tibetan bouddhism


The refuges


The General
Preliminaries


The Profound
Vision

The Profound Vision

Before meditating on these two stages, one will meditate on the profound vision so as to purify one's mind.

Starting by relying on various example experiences such as dreams etc., one will realise that exterior phenomena do not have any intrinsic reality of their own, but that they are induced by and dependent on the mind that perceives then.

One will then examine if mind alone is real, and, using other examples such as mirages, one will see that mind constantly changes. Mind varies according to "the various colours of thoughts" and is therefore very much like an illusion.

Reflecting still further on other examples, one will then arrive at the conclusion that even this illusion does not possess any intrinsic nature of its own. It is impossible to say that mind does not exist because it has this aspect of clarity, i.e. various perceptions arise from it without end. And it is impossible to say that it exists because one cannot find any distinctive characteristic which would be its own and stable. Therefore mind is devoid of any intrinsic nature, inseparable union of clarity and emptiness.

This is the profound Tantric Vision which is called the inseparability of Samsara and Nirvana. Samsara is the circle of existence, the world of manifestation; and Nirvana, the state beyond suffering, emptiness.

It is said:

"Abandoning Samsara, one will not find Nirvana elsewhere". This statement thus refers to the inseparable union of the two.

One will try to realise this profound vision not only during the meditation sessions which are especially designed for it, but equally during even the most insignificant events of our everyday life.

As always in Buddhism, one will not only endeavour towards intellectual understanding, which besides is very difficult for these profound paradoxical truths, but one will strive to genuinely realise them, to intimately experience them, which is the liberating experience which will completely transform our being.

This is the vision which realised beings always perceive.

Up to this point, we have tried to give a short introduction to the whole of the stages of the Tantric Path, without, however, entering into the details of practice which only the lama may transmit. But we believe that, if they reflect on these explanations, people who still hesitate will be well provided for deciding whether they want to get involved more deeply with the practice of Tibetan Tantric Buddhism.